Learn from me…

natural dyes

Natural Dye course...

dyeing with natural dyes is not a science... the colour obtain can vary greatly and be depend on many factors... the time of year a plant is picked... the growing conditions... the water... the mordents... the method used to extract the dye... as well as the type of fibre used...  so each and every time you use natural dyes the results you obtain have the potential to be different...  fibres dyed with natural dyes are not always colourfast... over time the colour can change too... but for me all these variant and possibilities is what makes dyeing with natural dyes so exciting...

  • a range of plants will be used on this course... the colours... shades... & hues obtain will be different...

  • the day will start at the family's allotment followed by a walk gathering plants...

  • once the vats of colour are simmering away... we will talk about the different types of fibres & mordents available...

  • then it will be time to add you fibre to the dye pots...

  • you will end the day with a selection of natural dye natural fibres to use in your own projects...

indigo-samples-workshop Indigo - indigofera Indigo... or magic indigo... as I think of it... really is in a class of its own...
  • start learning how to create an indigo vat...
  • fold... pleat... clamp... & stitch... fabric... learn a little about the history of 'shibori'
  • dye your fabric or thread... as many times of you like depending on how dark you like it...
  • then you have a choice... rinse it... leave it to dry... rinse it... or unwrap it...
ochre-001 Ancient Paint Palette spend a day with us on the foreshore learning how to create your own paint palette... from ochre & driftwood...
  • from collecting the raw ochre pigments thought to creating your own prehistoric paint...
  • learn about the most costly dye ever... tyrian purple...
  • collect drift wood to make into charcoal...
  • the earth's pigments were one of the first 'paints' used by man...
  • iron oxides produce colourful deposits...
  • some wonderful ochre yellows - reds - browns can be found...
  • these ochre colours together with carbon black were used in prehistoric cave paints...
  • the raw ochre is collected from the cliff between Staithes & Port Mulgrave...
  • once at Port Mulgrave the raw ochre is ground  to make a fine powder...
  • this powder is then used to make ochre paint...
  • a binder is  used together with the ochre powder to make a paste...
  • this paste can then be used to create 'art'...